Posts Tagged ‘Canning’

Sweet and Spicy Mango Chutney (?)

Wednesday, June 5th, 2013

Beautiful Ataulfo mangoes from Bountiful Baskets paired with red peppers 3 for $1 at one of my favorite stores, what does that mean?  Well, in my kitchen it means “Sweet and Spicy Mango Chutney”.  I don’t know that this could technically fall under the “chutney” category as it has no nuts, no raisons, and none of the curry flavors I associate with chutney.  It’s probably more like a salsa but since that is the name it came with, and I do not think it’s polite to rename someone else’s baby…chutney it is.

This recipe is beautifully simple to create and has a wide range of uses.  I start by dicing mangoes, red bell peppers, and yellow onion.  That all simmers in a mixture of brown sugar, apple cider vinegar and lime juice.  I add in finely chopped garlic and finely chopped ginger along with a happy helping of crushed red peppers.  When that is smelling good and looking pretty I pack it all into my warm pint or half-pint jars and water-bath the heck out of it (15 mins in my neck of the woods).

Sweet and Spicy Mango Chutney (?)

Ingredients

  • 6 cups diced unripe mango (about 3 to 4 large, hard green mangoes)
  • ½ cups diced red bell pepper
  • ½ cup finely chopped yellow onion
  • ½ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
  • 2 teaspoons finely chopped garlic
  • 2 teaspoons finely chopped ginger
  • 1 cup light brown sugar
  • 1¼ cups cider vinegar (5%)
  • ½ cup water

Instructions

  1. Wash and rinse half-pint canning jars; keep hot until ready to use. Prepare lids according to manufacturer's directions.
  2. Wash all produce well. Peel and chop mango into ½-inch cubes. Dice bell pepper into ½-inch pieces. Finely chop yellow onions.
  3. Combine all ingredients in an 8-quart Dutch oven or stockpot. Bring to a boil over high heat, stirring to dissolve sugar. Reduce to simmering, and simmer 5 minutes.
  4. Fill hot solids into clean, hot half-pint jars, leaving ½-inch headspace. Cover with hot liquid, leaving ½-inch headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace if needed. Wipe rims of jars with a dampened, clean paper towel; apply two-piece metal canning lids.
  5. Process in a boiling water canner. (10 mins to 1,000 ft- 15 mins from 1,001-6,000, 20 mins above 6,000)
  6. Let cool, undisturbed, for 12 to 24 hours and check for seals.
  7. Serve up and enjoy!

The shelf- life is supposed to be 1 year but with it’s delicious taste and versatility, mine has never lasted that long.  What do I do with it you wonder?  Thanks for asking because I really want to tell you.  One of my favorite ways to use it up is for a Sunday slow cooker meal that has become a family favorite.  I pop in a lightly seasoned pork roast, add a touch of water and let it go low and slow until it’s literally falling apart.  I shred that sucker up and mix in a pint of “Sweet and Spicy Mango Chutney”.  This “Sweet and Spicy Mango Pork” is then served over rice or in cabbage leaves and topped with macadamia nuts for a delicious Asian dinner.

We have discovered that this recipe is great on the grill. I open a jar, pour some into a ziplock bag and pop in a few chicken legs or thighs, whatever I have on hand.  I let that marinade for an hour or so (don’t go much longer or the vinegar will break down the chicken too much) and then put the chicken on the grill.  I serve extra sauce (NOT any that was used as marinade) right at the table.

I have also found success making it into a salad dressing.  I take a half-pint jar of the “chutney” and whisk that up with a combination of olive and sesame oil and use it to dress a chopped green salad or an Asian-style cabbage salad.

Last , but certainly not least, this sauce makes a great dip for my favorite wonton recipe.  I add a touch of sesame oil and some soy sauce to the chutney and then let my guests dunk away.  (I’m including the wonton recipe here just for fun.)

Chutney, Salsa, Sauce or just YUM!  Whatever you decide to call it I hope you enjoy this delicious way to use up those mangoes.

Baked Wontons

Ingredients

  • 10 oz (about 1 can) shredded chicken
  • 1 can water chestnuts- drained and finely chopped
  • 1/2 cup thinly sliced green onion
  • 1/4 cup grated carrots
  • 1 tsp finely grated fresh ginger
  • 1 T soy sauce
  • 1 egg white
  • 1 clove garlic pressed
  • Coconut oil (liquefied)
  • powdered garlic (optional)
  • 24 sqr wonton wraps

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 425.
  2. Mix chicken, and all other ingredients except coconut oil, wontons and powdered garlic.
  3. Stir powdered garlic into the coconut oil (if desired).
  4. Brush edges of wonton with water. Place a small scoop (about a tsp) of filling into the center. For large wontons top with a second wrap. For smaller ones fold in half like a triangle.
  5. Line a baking sheet with wax paper. Put the wontons on the wax paper and brush with the oil. Bake 12-15 minutes.

Pressure Canning Safety Tips

Friday, July 20th, 2012

To most people these may look like simple jars of home-canned pinto beans, but to me these beans are much more.  These jars celebrate an anniversary of sorts.  More importantly they are a symbol of my own courage and strength; and a reminder of  important lessons learned.  Too much for a pint of pintos to carry?  You may feel differently when you hear the whole story.
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Canning and Bountiful Baskets

Monday, January 30th, 2012

I am thrilled that Jeanne Gibbons, who participates with Bountiful Baskets in Arizona, is willing to share her experience with us when it comes to food, and especially, canning. Jeanne is a fount of knowledge when it comes to food preservation, which she often shares on our Facebook page. Without further ado:


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Food Swapping and Apple Cranberry Conserve

Saturday, December 10th, 2011

Have you ever participated in a food swap? This idea is something I first came across on the Bountiful Baskets Facebook Page. Someone had mentioned starting one up in Texas, and it got me a bit curious, so I started googling “Food Swap“. It turns out that food swapping is something we’ve probably all been doing all along, just in a more formal setting. The basic premise is that you bring your homemade, home-grown, or foraged food, and swap it for other people’s homemade, home-grown, or foraged food.

It sounded like fun.
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